This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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PHOTO: Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna sketches a portrait of Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovich on the balcony of the Alexander Palace, 1898

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 172,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following 5 full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 8 December 2018:

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ARTICLES – click on the red headline text below to read the respective articles

The Royal Children. Five Different Characters

This past summer, July 17, 2018, marked the centenary of the killing of the Romanov family—Tsar Nicholas, his wife, Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna, their daughters Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and son Alexei.

What were the royal children like? What did they dream of and what did they manage to achieve in their short, but so wonderful lives?

The extraordinary stories behind the ambassadors’ residences in Moscow + (PHOTOS)

Many beautiful examples of tsarist architecture have survived in Moscow. The former homes of the nobility, now house embassies, and have retained much of their Imperial splendour.

Memorial Plaque for Imperial Family’s Participation in Glorification of St. Seraphim Found in Sarov

Digging over the summer, staff from the Institute of Archaeology of the Russian Academy of Sciences unearthed a memorial plaque that commemorates the participation of Tsar Nicholas II and his family in the glorification of St. Seraphim of Sarov in 1903.

Cat employees, ghosts, hidden masterpieces: Why the State Hermitage is the world’s best museum + (PHOTOS)

The collection of art and artifacts at Russia’s largest and most famous museum is so huge that it would take no less than 10 years for you to see everything.

Yurevets: Rescued from the waves of the Volga + (PHOTOS)

Architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield writes in RBTH, about a river town crowned with cupolas.

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PHOTO: Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna with her brother Grand Duke Mikhail Alexandrovich at Gatchina, 1898

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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PHOTO: Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna with her brother Tsesarevich Alexei Nikolaevich, on the garden terrace leading into the Semi-Circular Hall of the Alexander Palace, 1909

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 172,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following 5 full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 24 November 2018:

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ARTICLES – click on the red headline text below to read the respective articles

A Pearl Earring and Imperial Russia

Royal historian Elizabeth Jane Timms writes about a pearl earring, which is currently on display in London. This extraordinarily poignant object has its own silent story to tell, concerning the fate of the Romanovs. Believed to have belonged to the Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna, this single pearl earring is symbolic of the pieces of the Tsarina’s personal jewellery that followed her – if indeed it is hers – literally until the end.

How did Moscow’s Kremlin become Russia’s main symbol of power and authority? + PHOTOS

Over two centuries ago, Napoleon planned to obliterate the main symbol of Russia, the Moscow Kremlin. Only thanks to natural forces and the people of Moscow was this tragedy prevented.

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PHOTO: A charming photo of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna, on the balcony of the Imperial Hunting Lodge at Spala, 1897

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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PHOTO: This lovely framed watercolour of Tsesarevich Alexei Nikolaevich (1904-1918), contains a curl of the heir’s hair, which is embedded between two griffins in the lower part of the frame.

Genetic testing recently confirmed that the sample is authentic. The framed image and hair sample are from the collection of the Belgrade Museum, and currently on display at the Nicholas II. Family and Throne exhibition, which runs until 15th April 2019, in the State Historical Museum in Moscow. Click HERE to read more about the exhibition.

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 171,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following 5 full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 17 November 2018:

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THIS WEEKS ARTICLES (Click on links below to review)

Russia in World War I: Was victory ‘stolen’ by a stab in the back?

Some experts claim that Russia was on the road to victory in the Great War but then it was abruptly sabotaged by selfish and cowardly politicians who organized the two revolutions in 1917, and who then later signed a separate peace deal with Germany. Is this thesis valid?

Just for fun . . . QUIZ: Chow time! Are you more like Ivan the Terrible or Nicholas II?

Answer the questions and find out the diet of which Russian ruler suits you better: Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great or Nicholas II.

The elephants that entertained Russian tsars

‘Russia is the motherland of all the elephants,’ an old joke goes. Ironically, there were numerous elephants have made their mark on the country. Some had tiger’s claws, drank vodka, entertained the tsars, and took part in weddings.

RT’s Multimedia Project #ROMANOVS100 Wins Silver at Clio Entertainment

#Romanovs100, a large-scale, cross-platform, multimedia project launched by RT to mark the centenary of the execution of the last Russian royal family, won silver at Clio Entertainment—a prestigious awards competition honoring outstanding work in the field of film/television promotion and advertising.

Stairway to heaven: The churches at Romanov + PHOTOS

Architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield writes in RBTH, about some of the most unique church architecture in central Russia.

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PHOTO: The highly anticipated exhibition Russia, Royalty and the Romanovs opened on 9th November. It showcases a collection of nearly 300 works, ranging from Fabergé eggs to jewellery, paintings, and letters, exploring the interconnections between the Romanov dynasty and the British royal family. The exhibition runs until 28th April 2019 in the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London, England. Click HERE for more details about the exhibition.

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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PHOTO: A recreated monument to Emperor Alexander II, was established on 8th November 2018 in the city of Gdov (Pskov region). It was originally made in 1911, however, it was demolished in 1919, by order of the new Soviet regime. The monument now stands near the Gdov Kremlin, opposite the Cathedral in Honour of the Icon of the Sovereign Mother of God.

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 171,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following 12 full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 10 November 2018:

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PHOTO: Grand Duke George Mikhailovich (b. 1981), heir to the pretender to the Russian throne, in front of a portrait of his first cousin three times removed Tsar Nicholas II (1868-1918), at the new exhibit Russia, Royalty & the Romanovs at the Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace, now open to the public through 28th April 2019

THIS WEEKS ARTICLES (Click on links below to review)

The Romanovs’ Relationship with the British Royal Family Is Explored in an Exhibit at Buckingham Palace

The Queen’s Gallery is hosting a new survey of artworks gifted between the two monarchies.

Vast Nicholas I portrait unveiled as Russians storm palace

Painting is one of 300 works at Buckingham Palace show exploring links to Romanovs

Russia, Royalty and the Romanovs review: Powerful family ties mean politics gets personal + PHOTOS

Relations between Britain and Russia are not entirely happy just now but it’s always useful to put these things into perspective. Which is where this exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery comes in.

Geneticists confirm curl from museum’s collection belongs to Tsarevich Alexey Romanov

Tsarevich Alexey’s curl will be exhibited at the “Nicholas II. Family and Throne” exhibition held from November 10 until April 15, 2019 at the Russian State Historical Museum in Moscow

Exhibition “Nicholas II. Family and Throne” opens at State Historical Museum in Moscow

For the first time the audience will see a large front portrait of Nicholas II painted by Lev Bakst in 1895, as well as rare photographs and memorabilia

Blood-stained shirt of assassinated Czar Alexander II returned to Russia

The blood-stained shirt of Czar Alexander II was brought to France after his death by his morganatic wife Princess Yurievskaya Catherine Dolgorukov

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A chandelier and the fate of the Romanovs

Royal historian Elizabeth Jane Timms presents a history of the glass chandelier from the grand duchesses bedroom in the Ipatiev House, and is currently on display at the ‘The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution’ exhibition in London, England.

The Mystery of Faberge Eggs and Legacy of the Romanovs Today

Russian Art + Culture journalist Emily Couch had the opportunity to talk to author Sophie Law about her work, Russian history, and what the legacy of the Romanovs means today.

5 minutes with… A monumental imperial Russian vase

Why would this prodigious vase, made made in St Petersburg by Russia’s Imperial Porcelain Factory, be adorned with a portrait of Emperor Franz I of Austria? Specialist Margo Oganesian reveals how she got to the bottom of a mystery with Napoleonic roots

Russia’s most beautiful church: The Resurrection Cathedral at Borisoglebsk + PHOTOS

Architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield writes in RBTH, about this example of classic architecture which remained open throughout the Soviet era.

5 picturesque estates near Moscow where famous and wealthy Russians lived + PHOTOS

Here are Russia’s most beautiful country estates that once belonged to outstanding writers, composers and artists.

How did British subs protect Russia in the Baltic during the First World War?

A flotilla of British submarines teamed up with the Russian Navy to fight the Germans in the Baltic Sea region during World War I. Despite a series of victories, it ended tragically.

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PHOTO: Aerial view of the Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo. The palace is now scheduled to start receiving its first visitors after reconstruction in late 2019, in which a third of the palace will be opened as a museum.

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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PHOTO: a view of the ruins of the Lower Dacha (situated on the shore of the Gulf of Finland in the Alexandria Park, Peterhof), as it looked in 1959.

During the Great Patriotic War (1941-45), the Nazis used the former Imperial residence as a base for its coastal defence. The building survived the war, and stood until 1961 when it was blown up by the Soviets – the Lower Dacha was left in ruins.

After their marriage in 1895, it was here that Nicholas II and Alexandra Feodorovna spent their first summer together. It was also here that four of their five children were born, three daughters: Tatiana (1897), Maria (1899), Anastasia (1901), as well as their only son and heir to the Russian throne, Tsesarevich Alexei Nikolaevich (1904). It was also at the Lower Dacha that in 1914, Nicholas II signed the Manifesto of Russia’s entry into the First World War.

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 171,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 3 November 2018:

ARTICLES – click on the red headline text below to read the respective articles

The Ghosts of World War I: Still No Peace for Russia’s Last Royal Family + VIDEO

Of all the countries that fought in the Great War, none was perhaps more affected than Russia. Dissatisfaction at home over Russian losses in World War I led to Tsar Nikolai II’s abdication of the Romanov throne and, several months later, the Bolshevik Revolution, sealed with the execution of the royal family by the new Soviet authorities in the Ural mountain city of Yekaterinburg. But as Charles Maynes reports, Russian attempts to bring closure to the Romanov story remain elusive even today.

‘Romanovs are role models’: Kremlin hosts conference marking royal family martyrdom anniversary

The descendants of Russia’s last emperor, officials from Moscow and other regions of Russia, Orthodox clerics and historians came to the State Kremlin Palace on Thursday for the annual readings, dedicated to Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna and other members of the Russian royal family, who were executed by the Bolsheviks in 1918.

Royal riches from Russia + PHOTOS + 2 VIDEOS

Priceless gems and intimate portraits that recall the bond between the Romanovs and Windsors are the stars of a dazzling new exhibition ‘Russia: Royalty & The Romanovs’ which opens next month at The Queen’s Gallery in London.

Inside the Enduring Mystery of What Happened to Russia’s Imperial Jewelry

A look inside the Romanov jewelry catalogues that mother Russia doesn’t want you to see. Stellene Volandes writes in Town & Country

Which of the Romanovs holds the rights to the Russian throne?

After the fall of the Tsarist regime on March 2, 1917, those Romanovs who managed to escape capture by the Bolsheviks sought refuge abroad. Since then, several Romanovs have claimed to be the legal successors to the non-existent Russian throne, and they’re still arguing! Georgy Manaev writes in RBTH

The Romanov Family Tree: Real Descendants and Wannabes + PHOTOS & VIDEO

Czar Nicholas II’s immediate family were all murdered in 1918. But there are still living descendants with royal claims to the Romanov name. Sarah Pruitt writes in History

On This Day: Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna Was Born

Royal historian Elizabeth Jane Timms writes about the birth of Princess Elisabeth of Hesse and by Rhine, later Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna of Russia, born in Darmstadt on 1st November 1864.

What languages did the Romanovs speak?

The Russian royals were a multilingual lot: from childhood future emperors and princes learned at least two or three foreign languages. For some, even Russian seemed less familiar than European languages.

Meet the face of evil . . . 5 radical Russian women who dedicated their lives to overthrowing the Tsar

Murdering an emperor? Organizing a revolution? Spending 30 years in prison? Nothing was too difficult for these female revolutionaries who dedicated their lives to bringing down the Russian Empire.

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PHOTO:  Grand Duchess Maria Georgievna (born Princess Maria of Greece and Denmark, 1876-1940) and her two daughters Princess Nina Georgievna (1901-1974), and Princess Xenia “Tommy” Georgievna (1903-1965). London 1917.

Grand Duchess Maria Georgievna was the fifth child and second daughter of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia. On 30 April 1900, Maria was married in Corfu to Grand Duke George Mikhailovich (1863-1919). George was shot along with three other Romanov grand dukes by the Bolsheviks, on the grounds of the Peter and Paul Fortress in St Petersburg on 28 January 1919.

Nina was the mother of the late Prince David Chavchavadze (May 20, 1924 – October 5, 2014), a former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) officer, and author of several books including ‘The Grand Dukes’.

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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Greeting from the Head of the Russian Imperial House
HIH Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 166,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 13 October 2018:

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ARTICLES – click on the red headline text below to read the respective articles

Why does a Brit fight for the truth about Nicholas II and the Romanovs? + PHOTOS

Many people around the world are interested in Russia’s last tsar, but few are so passionate as Paul Gilbert who has devoted his life to studying the last Imperial family. Alexandra Guzeva writes in RBTH

Why did Britain’s King George V betray Russia’s last tsar?

Russia’s last tsar, Nicholas II who was shot dead by the Bolsheviks together with his family, could have escaped this grim fate and left Russia after the abdication in March 1917. His cousin King George V offered Nicholas II refuge, but then unexpectedly withdrew the offer – and later tried to cover up the fact. Alexey Timofeychev writes in RBTH

Royal SCANDAL: King George V RUTHLESSLY knifed Tsar Nicholas in back to save Royal Family

KING George V has been revealed as a key architect in the demise of his cousin Tsar Nicholas II of Russia at the height of the Russian revolution, after failing to provide asylum to the Russian monarchy in a bid a protect the House of Windsor. Matthew Robinson writes in ‘The Daily Express’.

Balmoral Castle nearly became home to Tsar Nicholas II after the Russian Revolution

A new biography on King George V claims that the royal retreat was considered as a possible residence for the Romanovs after they were overthrown by the Bolsheviks in March 1917. Heather Greenaway writes in ‘The Daily Record’

10 archive photos of St. Petersburg’s devastating flood

The boggy area where the Neva River flows into the Gulf of Finland isn’t an ideal place to build a city, but Peter the Great didn’t care. The locals who suffered terrible floods did, though.

Life Principles of Grand Duchess Elizabeth

Deeds and letters are those things that in the best possible way show what kind of person someone is. The letters of Grand Duchess Elizabeth reveal the principles which laid the foundation of her life and relationships with people around her. These letters help us understand the reasons why the high-society beauty became a saint in her lifetime.

Peter I’s cottage to Gorbachev’s lavish dacha: Russian leaders’ residences in pictures + 28 PHOTOS

Russia’s rulers have always lived in style. Tsarist palaces reached the peak of their luxury in the late 18th century, but it set a lavish precedent that even Soviet leaders found hard to resist. Tommy O’Callaghan writes in RBTH

Just for fun . . . History quiz – The Romanovs

How much do you know about the last Russian royal family, the Romanovs? Put your knowledge to the test with this quiz, written by Gill Paul, author of ‘The Lost Daughter…’

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Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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Bust of Tsesarevich Alexei Nikolaevich (1904-1918)

Sculpture, glazed plaster study (for marble) by the Italian sculptor Pietro Canonica, 1910. The finished bust by Canonica was set on a tall pedestal in the Maple Drawing-Room of the Alexander Palace, Tsarskoye Selo.

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Canonica’s bust of Alexei can be seen on a pedestal in the center of the Maple Drawing-Room. Photo courtesy of Aleksandar Tanasijevic. 

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 165,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 6 October 2018:

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ARTICLES – click on the red headline text below to read the respective articles

Royal riches from Russia + PHOTOS & 2 VIDEOS

Priceless gems and intimate portraits that recall the bond between the Romanovs and Windsors are the stars of a dazzling new exhibition ‘Russia: Royalty & The Romanovs’ which opens next month at The Queen’s Gallery in London.

The spire at Verkhoturye: Gateway from the Urals to Siberia + PHOTOS

Architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield writes in RBTH, about this outpost of Orthodoxy, which benefits from a dramatic natural setting.

7 objects so huge the Russians called them tsars

Turns out some things can be too big…

North America’s First Chapel to the Royal Passion-Bearers Opens in Canada

North America’s first chapel-monument in honor of the holy Royal Passion-Bearers was officially opened on Saturday in Jackson’s Point, not far from Toronto, Ontario.

What You Need to Know About the Real Russian Romanov Family Mystery Before Watching ‘The Romanoffs’ + VIDEO – Official Trailer

The series is inspired by the mystery of the Romanov family and follows a collection of fictional, modern-day individuals who claim to be related to the the Russian Imperial Family. Note: the link to this article is for information purposes only, it does not constitute endorsement by myself or that of Royal Russia – PG

Who are Russia’s best-known monarchs? + VIDEO

RBTH examines the reigns of three famous Romanov sovereigns, all of whom help to expand Russia’s territory, modernize and reform the country.

VIDEO: The Last Tsar. Blood & Revolution

Here is a short VIDEO of the London exhibition, which includes the chandelier from the grand duchesses bedroom in the Ipatiev House in Ekaterinburg

Hunting, boating and enjoying the snow:

Newly-discovered photos show Tsar Nicholas II’s family at play before Russian revolutionaries executed them. More photos + video from the Science Museum exhibit in London, England

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A beautiful gold bracelet, bearing the image of the Empress Maria Alexandrovna (born Princess Marie of Hesse and by Rhine, 1824-1880). Samuel Arnd, St. Petersburg, circa 1875.

Empress Maria Alexandrovna was consort of Russia as the first wife of Emperor Alexander II (1818-1881). She was the mother of Emperor Alexander III (1845-1894).

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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Mrs Olga Kulikovsky praying at the Monastery of the Holy Royal Passion-Bearers at Ganina Yama, 17th July 2018

Mrs Olga Kulikovsky, the widow of the eldest son of HIH Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna, marked her 92nd birthday on September 20th.

She lives most of the year in Russia, where she tours the country with exhibitions which feature paintings and other personal items that once belonged to her famous mother-in-law. She is often present at events honouring the Holy Royal Martyrs, and is highly respected by Orthodox Christians.

Mrs Kulikovsky continues to work tirelessly, defending the good name of Russia’s last tsar Nicholas II.

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 160,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 22 September 2018:

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ARTICLES – click on the red headline text below to read the respective articles

‘The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution’ exhibition opens tomorrow – Friday 21st September + PHOTOS

Beginning tomorrow, the exhibition at the Science Museum in London, England will showcase a treasure trove of photographs of the last tsar and his family, found in the archives of the Science and Media Museum in Bradford.

Newly discovered photographs reveal family life of the Romanovs – in pictures

Photographs of Tsar Nicholas II and family go on show at Science Museum in London. The images were captured by Herbert Galloway Stuart, an English tutor to the nephews of Tsar Nicholas II, between 1908 and 1916. They were unearthed by chance at the National Science and Media Museum in Bradford

Newly discovered photographs reveal family life of the Romanovs

Another article about the huge collection of photographs, filling 22 albums taken by Herbert Galloway Stuart, an English tutor to the nephews of Tsar Nicholas II, between 1908 and 1916.

Romanov Murder Mystery: Launch of the Last Tsar. Blood and Revolution Exhibit in London

Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs, on the launch of new exhibition The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution.

5 artworks from the Romanovs exhibition in Buckingham Palace

Faberge and historic portraits shared between Russia and Britain before the Revolution feature in a new exhibition due to start in the The Queen’s Gallery of Buckingham Palace in London, England on November 8th.

How the Savior Borodino Convent was saved from the ravages of time + PHOTOS

Architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield writes in RBTH, about the famous site, born from personal tragedy, now a national shrine.

8 best movies about Russia’s dethroned royal family: The Romanovs + VIDEO TRAILERS 

Many mysteries still hang over the life of the last Romanovs, including their relationship with the ‘Mad Monk’ Rasputin and the circumstances of their murder. It’s therefore no surprise that filmmakers from Russia, Hollywood, and Europe continue to take inspiration from their story.

Lost Masterpieces of Imperial Romanov Liturgical Silver on View at Museum of Russian Icons

The Museum of Russian Icons in Clinton, MA., will be presenting ‘Opulence Rediscovered: the Romanov Liturgical Silver’, the first exhibition in more than 50 years of a lost masterpiece, October 19, 2018 – January 13, 2019.

This extraordinary set of Russian Orthodox liturgical implements was made in 1877 as part of the imperial dowry of Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna (1853-1920), the only surviving daughter of Emperor Alexander II, who married Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, in 1874, and used this opulent silver set in her private chapel in the Clarence House British Royal Residence in London.

Avoiding the horrors of war: Who were Russia’s most peaceful rulers?

These Russian monarchs tried to pursue their goals mainly through peaceful means. What did they achieve?

QUIZ: Can you guess what happened to the Romanovs’ treasures?

The Romanov family owned a huge collection of jewels, every single one of which has its own unique story. But what happened to them, and where are they now?

100 Years Since the Murder of the Russian Imperial Family at Yekaterinburg

A tragedy recalled in this column in ‘Spectator Australia’ on 25th July 2018.

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PHOTO: The cover of the 496-page catalogue from the forthcoming Russia: Art, Royalty and the Romanovs exhibition, which runs from Friday, 9 Nov 2018 – Sunday, 28 Apr 2019, in the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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Paul Gilbert “Son of Old Russia”

In anticipation of the forthcoming release of the English version of our book The Romanov Royal Martyrs the Brotherhood of Mesa Potamos Monastery would like to thank Paul Gilbert for his great and continuous support to our project. Our dear friend Paul Gilbert has spent the last 25 years of his life to researching and writing about the Romanov dynasty, and the history of the Imperial Russia. Through his uniquely excellent Royal Russia website he has repeatedly posted articles, special tributes, and announcements in relevance to our project.

Thank you Paul! May God bless your great work!

For all the links to Paul Gilbert’s multidimensional Romanov publishing work and his meritorious online activities visit: Paul Gilbert. Researcher, Publisher & Editor

Published on 14th September 2018 by Βασιλομάρτυρες Ρομάνοφ / Romanov Royal Martyrs

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 158,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 15 September 2018:

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ARTICLES – click on the red headline text below to read the respective articles

Avoiding the horrors of war: Who were Russia’s most peaceful rulers?

These Russian monarchs tried to pursue their goals mainly through peaceful means. What did they achieve? Alexey Timofeychev writes in RBTH

100 Years Since the Murder of the Russian Imperial Family at Yekaterinburg

A tragedy recalled in this column in ‘Spectator Australia’ on 25th July 2018

Russia’s elite Guards units in photos

They’ve fought in every important conflict Russia has been involved in over the past three centuries. They used to be a powerful political force that could pick and depose tsars as they wished. Here’s a brief history of the Russian Guards.

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A new painting local artist Anvar Batarshin, depicting Emperor Nicholas II’s 1904 visit to Kuznetsk was unveiled at the Kuznetsk Museum and Exhibition Center.

The emperor arrived in Kuznetsk in the summer of 1904 to inspect military units heading to the Russo-Japanese War. He is was greeted at the station by the Saratov governor P.A. Stolypin (right), who later served as Prime Minister of Russia, and Minister of Internal Affairs of the Russian Empire from 1906 until his assassination in 1911. Count Vladimir Fredericks (left), who served as Imperial Household Minister between 1897 and 1917, is also depicted in the painting.

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia

This Week in the News – The Romanovs and Imperial Russia

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PHOTO: The newly restored Equestrian Portrait of Emperor Alexander II (1875), went on display this week in the Museum of Fine Arts in Veliky Novgorod. The portrait, which depicts the emperor in the uniform of the His Majesty’s Life-Guards Hussar Regiment, was painted by Nikolai Yegorovich Sverchkov (1817-1898).

Presumably, the ceremonial portrait was ordered for the museum of the His Majesty’s Life-Guards Hussar Regiment, which was located at the headquarters in Tsarskoye Selo. The portrait was transferred to the Novgorod Museum in 1948.

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This Week in the News includes a link and brief summary to full-length articles published in the past week from English language media and internet sources.

This initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page – now, with more than 156,000 followers from around the world!

Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 8 September 2018:

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ARTICLES – click on the red headline text below to read the respective articles

Conference Marking the 150th Anniversary of the Birth of Royal Martyr Nicholas II to Take Place in late October

Thank you to the Russian Orthodox web site PRAVMIR.COM for posting the following notice, about the Nicholas II Conference, to be held on Saturday 27th October, in Colchester, England

Exhibition: The Cross of the Romanovs

One more exhibition devoted to the Russian Royal Family was produced by the Grand Duchess Elizabeth Romanov Society and will present about 140 professionally restored archival photographs including some very recent discoveries, films, rare documents and oil painted portraits.

6 Russian-British royal relations that changed the course of history

The notorious Ivan the Terrible almost married Elizabeth I, but things got complicated. Here’s our story about who married whom, and who’s related to whom in the British and Russian royal families.

Ever your devoted friend: Alix and Pollie

Royal historian Elizabeth Jane Timms writes about the friendship between Princess Alix of Hesse (future Empress Alexandra Feodorovna and Marion Louisa ‘Pollie’ Delmé-Radcliffe, Baroness Ungern-Sternberg.

Found: A Coin That Stopped the Tsar’s Police From Shaving You

Archaeologists in Russia have recently stumbled upon a 1699 coin issued to mark compliance with the “Beard Tax,” which Tsar Peter the Great had introduced the year before.

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© The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Preserve

PHOTO: The restoration of the Chapelle, located in the Alexander Park at Tsarskoye Selo, is nearing completion. Constructed between 1825 and 1828 by the famous architect Adam Menelaws, the Chapelle was badly damaged during the Great Patriotic War (1941-45). Restoration on the pavilion began in 2015, and is scheduled to be open to the public in the autumn of 2018.

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Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia